Wiredja Online News Logo

WiredJa Online News

Wiredja Online News Logo

WiredJa Online News

Opposition Uses Maduro Family Drug Case to Revive Impeachment

Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro holds a portrait of late President Hugo Chavez during a pro-government rally in Caracas, Venezuela Nov. 23, 2016. | Photo: Reuters Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro holds a portrait of late President Hugo Chavez during a pro-government rally in Caracas, Venezuela Nov. 23, 2016. | Photo: Reuters
In its latest show of division, elements of the Venezuelan opposition appear to be using the U.S. drug case against two nephews of Venezuela’s first lady in order to halt the Vatican-brokered peace talks with the government after the case was brought up during a Tuesday night National Assembly session.

Opposition coalition leader Jesus Torrealba, who has been one of the more vocal pro-talk lawmakers, claimed that government negotiators failed to show up for at least two meetings with the opposition.

Meanwhile, Henrique Capriles, another opposition leader and two-time presidential candidate, accused the government of freezing the talks as retaliation against his lawmakers for bringing up his family’s drug case during the heated session about impeaching him.

But President Maduro has dismissed the notion that he has suspended the talks, suggesting the opposition, unlike his government, has yet to fulfill all of its commitments.

"When we adopt documents and commitments, we fulfill the word committed,” he said after a meeting with former Spanish President José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero at the presidential palace.

“The whole national and international community must know that when we adopt a commitment, we fulfill it because the great majorities of this country want coexistence and respect," he added.

The widely-hailed dialogue between the government and opposition has so far resulted in the government freeing several individuals the opposition terms “political prisoners" as well as the resignation of three opposition lawmakers whose victory in the elections was deemed unlawful by the Supreme Court.

The opposition has also halted an impeachment trial against Maduro in the National Assembly and suspended efforts to enact a referendum calling for early presidential elections this year.

The row over the faith of the talks came as it was revealed that informants in the case against the two nephews of Venezuela’s first lady were paid nearly US$2 million to release information to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency.

Venezuelan Foreign Minister Delcy Rodriguez announced on Twitter Wednesday that she had filed a complaint with the Public Prosecutor's Office against opposition leader Capriles.

She is accusing him of making false accusations and the "falsification of a public document," relating to Capriles' allegation earlier this week that the first lady’s nephews held diplomatic passports when they were arrested in Haiti in November 2015.

Some parties in the fractured right-wing coalition have refused to get on board with Capriles while other opposition figures have given the government an ultimatum, threatening to walk out of the talks if their demands are not met.

  • Countries: Jamaica

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.